Investor Membership

Thank you for your interest in investing! Our community share offer has now closed.

Our social care system is systematically disempowering the people it's supposed to serve. It's time to radically reshape it.

Click here to download our booklet telling you what we're building and what we want to achieve. Click here to download the share offer document.

What are the offer details?


  3% interest paid from July 2022 and money withdrawable from July 2023

  50% income and capital gains tax relief available for the first £150,000 invested 

  30% income tax relief available after the first £150,000 

  Minimum investment £100 per individual

  Maximum investment £30,000 per individual

  Organisations can invest up to £100,000

  The offer is time-limited, opening 12th June and closing 14th August


​frequently asked questions 

Do I have to become an Investor Member in order to support you?
 Investor Members are people who support Equal Care Co-op's aims and vision and also want to join us for the journey. Membership is voluntary if you want to donate but you will automatically become a Member if you invest in us through a community share offer.
What's a community share?
 Community shares are withdrawable shares that cannot be sold, traded or transferred between Members, unlike shares in a typical company. All Members are entitled to one vote – regardless of how many shares they hold. Members can be paid interest on their shares if the board believe it would be sensible to do so and can also withdraw their shareholding, along with any interest accrued, again subject to the approval of the board. 
Is the community share offer regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority?
No. This is because you cannot transfer them to anyone else (either by selling them or gifting them) and because the capital value of the shares does not change, although they may be revised down as part of an annual audit. The only circumstance where you may transfer your shares is if you die and you would need to nominate someone to transfer them to when you invest. If you invest above £5,000 you would need to specifically name the person you're transferring them to in your will. 

Because the offer is not regulated you would not have right to compensation from the Financial Services Compensation Scheme, nor would you have right of complaint to the Financial Ombudsman.
Can I invest on behalf of a child?
No. However, anyone over the age of 16 can invest (but only people aged 18 or above can serve as directors).
What if the society becomes insolvent?

If we did become insolvent, the ability of investors to recoup the funds they have invested would depend on firstly the value we (or the appointed insolvency practitioners) could get for the assets of the society and secondly, the value of our debts at that point.

In the event of our insolvency or orderly winding-up, the proceeds from the sale of those assets and our cash would firstly pay off all our creditors, and if there were any funds left at that point, would be used to pay back shareholders as much of their investment as they have outstanding as possible, on a pro-rata basis.

As a ‘common ownership’ society, our rules state that should there be any surplus after returning funds to investors this would have to be given to another organisation supporting the co-operative movement and which has a similar common-ownership clause.

What if I don't get my investment back?

Investors who have claimed tax relief would also be eligible to claim loss relief against their tax liability for the difference between what they invested less any tax relief already claimed and what was returned to them. So, let’s say someone has invested £1,000, using the cash made from selling an asset that’s deemed a capital gain. They can claim 50% of it against their income tax, and also reduce the Capital Gains Tax bill by half. All told they reduce their tax bill by £640, meaning they have invested £1,000 at a cost to them ultimately of just £360.


Let’s say we then become insolvent and no one gets their money back. As far as HMRC are concerned, that means the investor has lost the value of their investment less their 50% income tax relief, so they’ll be able to declare that £500 loss against their tax liability. If they pay 40% tax, that’s another £200 saved of the investment, reducing the total loss again to £160.

Do I have to do anything as an Investor Member?
All Members sign up to the Members' Commitment and agree to abide by Equal Care Co-op's rules. This includes attending an Annual Members' Meeting (the AGM) with the option of attending three others over the course of the year. You can do this virtually or in person, or appoint a proxy to vote in your stead.
Would I become liable for anything?
No, you have no liability beyond the amount of your investment or members payment.
What's different about being an Investor Member compared to the other types?
Investor Members aren't directly involved in the service of the co-operative, so their decision-making power is limited to 10% of any vote. We want Equal Care Co-op to work in the interests of those it affects directly: people giving and receiving support. Read more about the different membership categories here.
Can I change my membership category?
Yes, if you work or volunteer for Equal Care Co-op, or if you are being supported by the co-operative, you can change your membership category. This then gives you 'One Member, One Vote' voting rights.
Can I see what you spend the money on?
Yes. For those of you interested in investing you will see all the documents necessary to make an informed decision. Once you become an Investor Member (either through donation or investment) you will get quarterly reports showing what is being spent and where.